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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
to have paula faris, and rachel smith, host of "on the red carpet" back with us this morning. >>> and we're back from the holidays. we're all thinking about returning the gifts, right? just kidding. there's people that are going to be in the return lines. becky worley is here with the scoop on how to score on both. >>> let's get right to sam. he's been tracking the rough weather that's impacted so many millions over the week. >> some prepared for it. they were warned in advance. what a night. 34 tornadoes rocked that area. the previous christmas tornadoes had been 12 in 1969. when we tell you this was an epic event, it truly was. take a look at some of the damage. the abc station from birmingham, sending us some pictures from the mobile area. look at these in the deep south. new orleans to montgomery. outside of new orleans, tornado warnings all over the deep south. last night, on twitter, your pictures were sending us all the damage. matt gutman was landing in mobile just about the time that storms got to that area. what's it like this morning? >> reporter: as the sun is coming up, we'r
. george, robin, lara, all at home with their families today. great to have amy, paula and rachel back with us this morning. >>> also, a very big headline in the fiscal cliff showdown. now, just four days from heading over the edge. the meeting that could change it all today at the white house. jon karl is here with the very latest on that. >>> and then, we have a shocking headline this morning. teachers training to shoot guns on the job. using this holiday break to learn how to handle firearms. applications for these classes are up all across the country. we're going to talk much more about that in a bit. >>> we want to get right to the breaking news this morning. it affects so many americans hoping to adopt. the president of russia has just signed a bill, banning americans from adopting russian children. and this now blocks kids from being adopted by american families, leaving russia, to move here to start a new life. abc's lama hasan has the latest from london. good morning to you, lama. >> reporter: good morning to you, josh. this controversial new bill banning u.s. citizens from a
's one of the major reasons i personally don't wear skinny jeans. abc's rachel smith, is looking into whether hot pants can make you a hot mess. >> good morning, guys. maybe feeling like a hot mess is more like it. many of us have been a victim of fashion at some points in our lives. seeing people wearing the jeans everywhere. skin-tight, painted on. and they look great. but what if that trend pinches more than your wallet and crushes more than your ego. ♪ i got my tight pants on >> reporter: will ferrell may have mocked them on jimmy fallen. but everybody's getting into them. the first family. taylor swift. even her new beau. but this fashion do may pose some troubling health don'ts. those tight pants can squeeze more than your silhouette. pinching the nerves in your hip. >> it's a sore that occurs when one of the nerves that runs in the outer part of the thigh gets compressed. and pressure on it causes symptoms of tingling, numbness and pain. >> reporter: other possible health hazards, abdominal pain, heartburn, even blood clots. but fashionistas were willing to take the risk
with our espn colleague rachel nichols for one triumphant return. chuck pagano faced heavy odds. the team fresh off an awful season. the new pick the rookie quarterback taking over for the departed peyton manning. the coach already facing so much pressure and then less a month in the diagnosis. the 52-year-old coach had leukemia. away from the field, pagano was facing tremendous hurdles of his own. the coach with our colleague rachel nichols. >> what were used to do? the simplest things that you couldn't do? >> getting out of bed, going to the restroom, brushing my teeth. it physically tears you down to the point where, you know, you lose 20, 25 pounds, you know, you a trophied. >> the team playing for the team. the team's mantra chuck strong and the team began to win remarkably turning their record around. making it to the playoffs. and as the coach began to regain his strength, rare visits to the team. >> i'm dancing to two more wins. >> the messages from the champions offer the field. fellow survivor and i beat it. it can. you can beat it, too. >> i know i can. >> the constant checking
because you never know what exciting opportunities that might bring. for example, rachel maddow showed the staff that she has a talent that has no discernable value in the marketplace. >> what was the other trick you do? this one. >> that one upsets me. >> it's just the sound of one hand. >> it doesn't matter. >> i have always -- i have always been impressed by rachel maddow when i watched the show. and now when i tried to host the show, i'm beyond impressed with what she does. now i know she can make the sound of one hand clapping, i am bowled over. best new thing in the world today. rachel maddow will be back for a special edition of new year's eve. "weekends with alex witt" is next. >>> new year's resolution? will a last-minute fiscal cliff deal get done? and if it does what will it look like. >>> we have a deal. we may still get hit with an automatic tax hike. how much will that cost you? in time for the new year, a new snowstorm headed to the northeast. we'll let you know how bad this will get. and the yore in review, up with of the most unique and appalling takes on the ye
two months of wiggle room. >>> well, last night on "the rachel maddow show," guest host ezra klein asked former clinton budget director alice rivlin on where we could see the fallout from the fiscal cliff. >> the real uncertainty i think is what the markets will look isn't in control of its own destiny because we're acting that way right now. now, if you're an investor, whether you're in some part of the united states or you're in some other part of the world, do you really want to buy american securities? do you want to invest in a country whose government isn't functioning? i don't think so. so, we could get a big market reaction, a drop in the stock market, and that might scare people. >> "the rachel maddow show" week nights at 9:00 eastern right here on msnbc, the place for politics. >>> home prices on the rise, syria's head of preventing defections decides to defect. your headlines are straight ahead. plus, connecting the dots on sonia sotomayor, health care and a fine. you're watching "first look." >>> some stories making news this morning. toyota says it's reached a more th
. caller: exactly. >> bill: i hadn't thought about that. yeah. rachel down in nashville, tennessee, hey rachel good morning. caller: bill we talked before about the 47%. can you please tell me why we don't just call their bluff? they are always talking about the job creators. all we have to do so, bi, is say, fine. you want all of this on your dividends, you crate a job, you get a tax break. >> bill: makes sense to me. it's the whole idea that people like, you know, donald trump and sheldon adelson and the koch brothers are the job creators right? it's total nonsense. all they do with that money, that extra tax cut they get is they squirrel it away buy another vacation house or another yacht or another corporate jet. it's not going into creating jobs or investing in america. >> why don't we call their bluff? >> bill: well, you know, we are trying to this morning, here, rachel. some others are, too. but here is with a i would say. i wish president obama would do what we are doing this morning and call out john boehner and just identify him as the villai
for psychologist mary sherlach and teacher's aide, rachel davino. also services for three children. also 7-year-old grace mcdonnell and olivia engel and dylan hockley. as the town mourns the loss of so many young lives, many residents are coping in their own way. that moment of silence, i thought, was very beautiful and very powerful and sometimes i wonder when people have been through a tragedy, is it helpful to folks who are mourning or is it just another moment that brings it all back? >> i mean, everyone celebrated that moment around the country, but we have been celebrating or having those moments of silence, celebrating is the wrong word. we've been through so many moments of silence in our churches, our synagogues. i've been to countless funerals this week of people who i knew well, people i grew up with. people, my children knew. and there is -- the moments of silence are -- they're deafening. i can't tell you how many we've had. at 9:30 today, there was a moment where we could all connect. all breathe deeply. and also realize it's only been a week. it's felt like a year, frankly. so fe
thirty." best actress, jessica chastain, helen mirren, naomi watts, rachel wise. best actor drama -- daniel day lewis for "lincoln." richard gere, john hawks, jauquin phoenix and denzel washington for "flight." so those are the highlights. and for the sake of the commish, do want to point out, for best television drama, "breaking bad" "boardwalk empire" "doubting abby," "homeland" and "the newsroom." just wanted to add that in there. for a show i love that he hates. but we have that ongoing feud. >> i love that clap. how is that jack? >> it's a good show. >> that i hear is great. >> willis and the commish can have a viewing party. >>> great thing happening in new york city last night. they had the sandy benefit. you saw bon jovi, bruce springsteen, everybody collaborating for the victims. but something mick jagger said on stage is a little insensitive. here's what he said. and he's drawing only ire and rage from some people. he said this has to be the largest collection of old english musicians ever assembled in madison square garden. but if it rains in london, you've got to come
. dawn hocksprung and mary sherlach, vicki soto, lauren russeau, rachel davino and anne marie murphy, they responded as we all hope we might respond in such terrifying circumstances, with courage and with love, giving their lives to protect the children in their care. we know that there were other teachers who barricaded themselves inside classrooms and kept steady through it all and reassured their students by saying, "wait for the good guys, they are coming. show me your smile." and we know that good guys came, the first responders who raced to the scene helping to guide those in harm's way to safety and comfort those in need, holding at bay their own shock and their own trauma, because they had a job to do and others needed them more. and then there were the scenes of the schoolchildren helping one another, holding each other, dutifully following instructions in the way that young children sometimes do, one child even trying to encourage a grownup by saying, "i know karate, so it's ok. i'll lead the way out." as a community, you've inspired us, newtown. in the face of indescribabl
here, rachel, and to have all of you here. it's a lovely summer evening, and it is getting hot out there. summer will now descend upon us. we have a special treat in store for you. as you probably have read and heard about recently the book rachel swarm was written "american tapestry." i am looking forward to hear hearing about the process of this book. to begin i think what the audience probably doesn't know is that we have a lot of support, kind of a community of behind-the-scenes players. starting with the genealogist then a fellowship and maybe just to get started let's talk about the book itself and how we arrived at this amazing story. >> you know, i wrote a story in october of 2009 about the first lady's family. that became the genesis of this book. i am a journalist. this is my first book. this is a new experience for me. >> congratulations. >> thank you. [applause] really, when i thought to do this i kind of have this notion of, okay, i am embarking on you know he deep dive into american history in the fir
's sister, rachel, was the first killed in the massacre in colorado and he was in the school library during that rampage. thanks for being with us this morning. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> i remember your story vividly. the whole country does. you were a young man in those hours after columbine and you spoke out so compellingly and compassionately and poignantly and i can only imagine now how more reports of school massacres like this affect you. what happened on friday when you heard the news? >> like everyone, just extreme sadness and brokenhearted. i knew that i especially felt for parents who lost their children and how devastated they were going to be. also it just -- it also just made me think about kind of where my generation is as far as what our values are and even the spiritual condition of our generation. because i look at the last few shootings that happened all from guys in their 20s, and it made me angry. >> craig, i was there for the weeks that followed at columbine as well being from denver, i unfortunately covered that. i'm curious about what you said about your generati
hashanah being the jewish new year that falls in september. thelled her "rachel" in book. and she was working very hard. she was at her mother's place cooking dinner, and she was in a real hurry, because she had to finish by 5:00, when her brother was going to arrive with his family, and he didn't like her. he didn't want to be at the dinner. so she had to finish the dinner and leave before he arrived. and i asked her, "are you serious? you're making dinner for a family that you're not going to take part in yourself? why? " and she said, "well, because the family should be together for rosh hashanah, shouldn't they?" well, she never finished the meal. her body said no. she came down with severe inflammation in all her joints, and she was rushed to the hospital with her first malignant outbreak of rheumatoid arthritis. and that self-suppression is typical for people that develop rheumatoid arthritis. it's also typical for people that develop als, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. i talk about the example of lou gehrig, if i may tell you about that. lou gehrig was this great baseball p
to battle leukemia. he sat down to talk about his recovery with rachell nichols of espn. >> you're in sports. you're a fit guy. what were you used to being able to do, the simplest things that you couldn't do anymore? >> we probably can't talk about some of them on camera. but you know, getting out of bed, going to the restroom, go brush your teeth. you know, things like that. it physically fares ytears you the point where you lose 20 to 25 pounds and you atrophy. >> i imagine it's like scoreboard watching when you're a coach. >> the doctor came in and said your counts are starting to come up. i said how good are they? he said good enough to go home. so you're like -- it's like a day early. so any way, he says what time is the game? and i said, we play at 1:00 today. he said you should be out of here by noon, and make it home in time to see the game from home. >> and you get to sit in front of your own television, in your own living room and watch the indianapolis colts play. >> yeah, it was awesome. it was a great day. it was a great day. >> wow. >> the emotions from these guys, big guys ou
hockley had dimples and the a mischievous grin. he loved movies and trampoline. rachel's boyfriend was about to propose. he recently asked her parents for their blessing. mary sherlock was looking forward to retirement. the school psychologist worked at sandy hook for two decades. >> dawn hochsprung, principal. mary sherlach, school psychologist. victoria soto, teacher. ann marie murphy, special education teacher. lauren rousseau, teacher. rachel davino, behavioral thermometer. charlotte bacon, 6 years old. daniel barden, age 7. olivia angle, age 6. josephine gay, age 7. ana marquez-greene, age 6. dylan hockley, age 6. madeleine hsu, age 6. catherine hubbard, age 6. chase kowalski, age 7. jesse lewis, age 6. james mattioli, age 6. grace mcdonnell, age 7. emilie parker, age 6. jack pinto, age 6. noah pozner, age 6. caroline previdi, age 6. gels ka rekos, also age 6. avielle richman, age 6. benjamin wheeler, age 6. allison wyatt, age 6. creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. it's lots of things. all waking up. nnecting
, kathleen, carolyn, rachel, eric, jennifer, chris, cody, greg, katelyn, stephanie, beth, bennett, nathan , emily, mary, abby, lee, shannon, christina, p.j., alex, nicki, randy, john, the two best veteran constituent service reps you could ever want. sharon, rachel, cara. mr. speaker, all of them were loyal to the district and i read their names into the record to thank them for their service and loyalty to me, with you especially for their service to -- but especially for their service to the district. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brook, for five minutes. mr. brooks: mr. speaker, the bush tax cuts history illuminates why american families face huge tax increases on january 1. the bush tax cuts had two purposes, first, stimulate the economy, create jobs, cut unemployment, and cut the deficit. second, cut taxes to help american families take care of their own needs. in just three years thanks to the bush tax cuts unemployment dropped from a high of 6.3% in 2003 to a low of 4.4% in 2006. seven million american jobs were created be
donald and olivia engel. school psychologist mary sherlock and behavioral therapist rachel devino were also laid to rest yesterday. meantime we are hearing new details about the gunman adam lanza. former classmates say he wore the same clothes to school every day and rarely spoke. he once gave a school presentation through a computer instead of speaking. a former high school classmate says lanza enjoyed playing a violent video game and one of the weapons he liked to use in that game was a military style assault rifle, same type of gun investigators say he used to shoot his victims at sandy hook. >>> a bay area man is using the internet to counter the national rifle association's controversial plan to stop gun violence. the nra's leadership says it wants armed officers at every u.s. school. >> the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. >> 31-year-old facebook engineer lucy icenberg has a different idea. he is behind an online commission on change.org asking the centers for disease control to research gun violence. >> there are about 30,000 people in america who die e
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)